Browsing: Baltimore Ravens

Eric Reid to visit the Bengals

A month into free agency, Eric Reid is finally drawing some interest.

Reid, the safety whose lack of offers has led some to suggest he’s being blackballed for kneeling during the national anthem, will visit the Bengals, according to Ian Rapoport of NFL Network.

The 26-year-old Reid has played his entire five-year NFL career with the 49ers. He became a free agent this offseason and there were no reports of any teams showing interest, even though he’s been a starter throughout his career.

Kyle Soppe: Ohtani has been simply amazing and may be in the process of ruining our perception of what a successful rookie season looks like (football fans saw this with the 2014 WR draft class), but I like this question as not all rookies need to steal all of the headlines to be considered a very early season success. For me, Jack Flaherty was outstanding in his lone appearance (5 innings, 1 earned run, and 9 strikeouts in a no decision against the Brewers) and positioned himself to be a worthwhile fantasy asset when (not if) he returns to The Show.

Sure, it was only one start, but the Brewers failed to make contact on nearly 37 percent of their swings against the rookie and his ability to keep the ball on the ground appeared legit to my eye. Fantasy baseball is a marathon, not a sprint, so don’t lose track of the big picture and try to make room for Flaherty sooner than later.

The meaning, inescapably, is this: Manziel thinks that the Browns should have known that he wasn’t going to study film, that he wasn’t going to work hard, and that he was simply going to wing it. To understand the problems with these remarks, it’s important to consider the broader context that emerged in early 2014.

Manziel worked very hard before the 2014 draft to create the impression that he’s a hard worker. He specifically refrained from the Super Bowl-week car wash, during which he would have made tens of thousands of dollars promoting products at Radio Row, because he supposedly was fully focused on football. He routinely declined interviews prior to the draft for that same reason. His trip to the Nike facility in Oregon raised eyebrows because it represented a rare break from the full-football focus.

Four years later, Manziel essentially wants to adjust the “fool me once, shame on you” adage to “fool me once, shame on me.” He fooled the Browns, and now — in that one isolated but fully accurate portion of his interview — he blamed the Browns for getting fooled.

“If Cleveland did any of their homework they would have known I wasn’t a guy who came in every day and watched film,” Manziel said. “I wasn’t a guy who really knew the X’s and O’s of football.”

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Fixing the arcane and clunky Catch Rule should be atop the league’s to-do list for on-field improvements in the offseason.

Pence and his wife exited the game after members of the San Francisco 49ers knelt during the national anthem to protest racism in America and police violence, claiming that it was disrespectful to veterans.

“I’d have thought you were crazy to think that, or I was crazy to think that,” Brady said. “This has just all been — I guess it’s my life, so I’m living it, and it feels very natural and normal, just because I wake up every day and I feel very much the same as I did when I walked in here 18 years ago, I really do. It’s a great privilege to play here, and it’s a great privilege to play in the NFL, and I try to represent the team well, I try to represent my family, I try to do things the right way, and I’m very blessed. I could never imagine getting the kind of team achievements we’ve done and had.

So I can just throw it in their general direction, and because I’m not under pressure and because they’re in the area, it won’t matter. And you saw what happened. I threw the ball and it looks like I’m throwing to nobody, but in my opinion — or before I threw the ball, my opinion was he’ll be in the general area.

But let’s hope the Raiders or Jets take their plight as a motivator to fix another puzzling article in the rulebook.

No, I’m not. First, we need to do something similar for player on-court and off-court stats. Jacob Goldstein started this process recently on Nylon Calculus, though his method tends to overstate the magnitude of good or bad luck for players because it doesn’t account for the fact that more missed shots also mean some points via offensive rebounds.

I’m a little more skeptical at the lineup level because the samples are so much smaller in most cases that I think looking just at shooting luck will ignore other possible sources of randomness.

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Bay Area newspaper breaks down how NFL owners will vote on Vegas

One thing the Vikings do well is stop the run. The Vikings surrendered just 83.6 yards per game on the ground in 2017, which ranked second in the NFL, and that number is a big reason why the Eagles might have to rely on Foles this week. If Jay Ajayi and LeGarrette Blount can’t find room to run, it’s going to be up to Foles to keep the Eagles offense moving.

In the early game on Saturday, the No. 1 seed Philadelphia Eagles will play host to the No. 6 seed Atlanta Falcons in an NFC matchup. Atlanta, the owner of last year’s No. 1 offense, defeated this year’s No. 1 offense (Rams), and now must travel north to Philadelphia and take on the Carson Wentz-less Eagles. Philly stumbled a bit down the stretch of the season but still has a strong defense and running game, and home-field advantage.

On Saturday night, the No. 1 seed New England Patriots will host the No. 5 seed Tennessee Titans in an AFC matchup. The Pats are heavy favorites, but the Titans are coming off a monster comeback victory over the Chiefs in their first round matchup. Tennessee’s strength is running the ball, which is New England’s exact weakness on defense. The Titans will have to figure out a way to stop Tom Brady, though, if they want to come away with a win.

In the first of Sunday’s two rematches, the No. 2 seed Pittsburgh Steelers will host the No. 3 seed Jacksonville Jaguars. The Jags beat up on the Steelers in Pittsburgh earlier this season, forcing Ben Roethlisberger into five interceptions in a 30-9 win.

I don’t know if anything has really changed except the panic of being left out and not getting the money, said Rob Rang, a veteran talent evaluator for NFLDraftScout.com. In today’s world of social media and expectations, young players are more easily convinced to try to take advantage of their perceived draft value.

The NFL began accepting prospects three years out of high school 29 years ago. That league tenet has survived periodic legal challenges for three decades. All of it has created a micro-population of elite athletes with something less than a full grasp of the process.

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