A month into free agency, Eric Reid is finally drawing some interest.

Reid, the safety whose lack of offers has led some to suggest he’s being blackballed for kneeling during the national anthem, will visit the Bengals, according to Ian Rapoport of NFL Network.

The 26-year-old Reid has played his entire five-year NFL career with the 49ers. He became a free agent this offseason and there were no reports of any teams showing interest, even though he’s been a starter throughout his career.

Kyle Soppe: Ohtani has been simply amazing and may be in the process of ruining our perception of what a successful rookie season looks like (football fans saw this with the 2014 WR draft class), but I like this question as not all rookies need to steal all of the headlines to be considered a very early season success. For me, Jack Flaherty was outstanding in his lone appearance (5 innings, 1 earned run, and 9 strikeouts in a no decision against the Brewers) and positioned himself to be a worthwhile fantasy asset when (not if) he returns to The Show.

Sure, it was only one start, but the Brewers failed to make contact on nearly 37 percent of their swings against the rookie and his ability to keep the ball on the ground appeared legit to my eye. Fantasy baseball is a marathon, not a sprint, so don’t lose track of the big picture and try to make room for Flaherty sooner than later.

The meaning, inescapably, is this: Manziel thinks that the Browns should have known that he wasn’t going to study film, that he wasn’t going to work hard, and that he was simply going to wing it. To understand the problems with these remarks, it’s important to consider the broader context that emerged in early 2014.

Manziel worked very hard before the 2014 draft to create the impression that he’s a hard worker. He specifically refrained from the Super Bowl-week car wash, during which he would have made tens of thousands of dollars promoting products at Radio Row, because he supposedly was fully focused on football. He routinely declined interviews prior to the draft for that same reason. His trip to the Nike facility in Oregon raised eyebrows because it represented a rare break from the full-football focus.

Four years later, Manziel essentially wants to adjust the “fool me once, shame on you” adage to “fool me once, shame on me.” He fooled the Browns, and now — in that one isolated but fully accurate portion of his interview — he blamed the Browns for getting fooled.

“If Cleveland did any of their homework they would have known I wasn’t a guy who came in every day and watched film,” Manziel said. “I wasn’t a guy who really knew the X’s and O’s of football.”